/dev/trouble
Eric Roller's Development Blog

For a while now, I have been puzzled by the fact that Mobile Safari, the iOS version of Safari, opened any page on my web site at a much larger width than the CSS value for the main content area (570px).

It turns out, there are a number of Apple-Specific Meta Tags that can be used to provide background information for your web page, like how to scale it, or providing scaling limits.

To set the initial scaling of a window when presented on the iPhone or iPad, there is the viewport meta tag. If missing, a default width of 960 pixels will be used, or more if the web content is wider. Setting it to 590 pixels, thus adding a 10 pixel padding, works just fine for my particular case:

<meta name="viewport" content="width:590px">

For years, I have had a constantly growing list of shop opening hours in my notes on my iPhone. There has never been a proper place to put them. Until now.

The Open Times iPhone app makes it simple to store all my shop opening times and it is flexible enough to handle any custom combination of when a shop opens and closes (or is open for 24 hours). Best of all, the business hours are presented graphically in a calendar-like view which is an intuitive way to check which of the shops are currently open or closed.

Now that I have entered my data into the app, I have confidently deleted that long entry from my notebook. Success!

phpMyAdmin

- Posted in General by

I see from my web-server log that people like to guess the path to phpMyAdmin in all different variations, colours, shapes and sizes. Now, this is exactly why I have not installed it in a fashion that makes it visible to anyone other than me. Better yet, come to think of it, I have not installed it at all and I don't think I ever will. But if I do, you should probably search for all variations, colours, shapes and sizes of phpMyNeatlyStashedAwayAndHiddenInstallationOfMyAdmin.